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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
: another piece of the expansion of civil rights, the subtle interaction between the supreme court and the popular opinion, the supreme court does respond to popular opinion and therefore, the four publicly embraced referenda that said we are willing -- we and our states want same-sex marriage. that affects the supreme court. >> yes. that's why -- it is an excellent point. that's why these marriage referendums that we just saw in the last election, which for the first time, gay rights advocates won -- all four marriage equality referendums the timing of that was very important because it came just before the supreme court reviewed this. obviously the court is going to look to public opinion to see whether or not the country is ready for same-sex marriage. >> eliot: it is not as though the justice of the court take polls and say 50% is for -- therefore my view of constitutional rights changes. even conservative jurists understand one's sensibility of rights changes as -- there is an evolution. >> over time, it is what
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
holdouts of an era when democrats dominated texas politics. brooks supported civil rights and refused to sign the segregation southern manifesto in 1956 and went on to right the civil rights act of 1964. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. >>> and which political story will make head leans in 24 hours contributor and manager editor, chris cizzilis rejoins us. when do you think they get down to seriously talking and you keep hearing that there's some optimism here of people who are really smart players. it's hard to find the signs of it. >> well, andrea, i would predict they won't in 24 hours. look. i do think -- i think the reason for optimism that you hear is because people don't believe politicians will willingly put themselves in a situation of tremendous uncertainty. that is, going over the cliff. no one knows what would happen. we all think, oh, there's economists saying it wo
to fight the battle 100 years again with the civil rights movement. good. i think many would make similar claims about world war i and world war ii. if he's trying to make a claim for really van gishing your enemies, that would do it. >> since they took over the house, they've stopped anything from getting done. congress is on track to become the least productive congress since 1947. how much pressure does that put on boehner to make a deal? >> you know, i think it's a really interesting open question, for this reason. they have managed to defy the laws of political gravity in that respect for basically the first four years. their idea is the normal idea of political gravity is that we have to go back to our districts and campaign on something. we have to tell them things that we have done and they have been relatively successful in not obeying that. the question is, does this election change their mind of what their incentives are? >> this is one of the basic rules of american congress, congress vote yes. up don't need to know what the topic or bill is. they tend to move legislation forw
baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the media should be raising here? >> t
on friday whether and how to weigh in on what some consider the civil rights showdown of the early 21st century. they could have announced this morning whether they'd chosen or rejected any or all of the marriage equality appeals but instead they stayed silent and the waiting game continues. joe johns joins me from washington to tell us what this all means. first off, is there anything, joe, to read in to this morning's silence coupled with friday's silence on this issue? >> honestly, nothing at all. they could still decide later in the week, quite frankly. they could decide next week. this is a thing about the court. they really don't send a lot of signals or messages to do something and we have been telling people all along that, you know, there's potential for this to come later on. they can still go in march with this. and we could still get a decision around june. so, don't read anything in to it. that said, you know the broad legal question the supreme court considers of equal protection. basically do same sex couples deserve the same rights and benefits as all other americans? we
's life is threatened by this legislation. joining him is fellow civil rights carrie kennedy. the center awarded frank for his efforts in uganda. good to have you here. you've been fighting this bill for years. david cato who is a friend of yours, recently killed in uganda for his work against fighting this bill. you've taken over his work. but are you basically handing yourself a death sentence by being on a program like this putting yourself in a line of fire? >> yes. i've been fighting this legislation for a long time now and if this legislation is passed into law, i will definitely be put life in prison or life -- or sentenced to death. and right knew, i'm here in new york with the human rights and have been providing a lot of support in trying to stop this legislation. the speaker says she wants to pass it as a christmas gift for ugandans. >> it is the pipeline, moved through a certain lower form of government there working up for a vote within parliament. carrie, why does the rfk center want to highlight a sister like frank and what is taking place in uganda? in america we're celeb
in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks was 89 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: lawmakers stepped up the rhetoric, but grew no closer today to agreement on how to avoid slipping over the so- called fiscal cliff. but each side demanded the other compromise. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> i have to just tell you that is a... that is a bad strategy for america, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: president obama today, in washington, assured business executives he'll reject attempts to link the fiscal cliff budget negotiations to future increases in the nation's debt ceiling. "the new york times" reported republicans might accept higher tax rates on wealthier americans to avoid triggering tax hikes for everyone. in return, they'd demand greater spending cuts next year before raising the federal borrowing limit. >> if congress in any way sugg
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
was not willing. what she is doing and i will say this because it needs to be said, i came out of the civil right movement and i was involved in the election of the first black mayors across america, chicago, philadelphia, atlanta, a lost places. for the congressional democrats to go out there and to attack her as racist and an attack on women, when are we going to reach a place in politics when where you lie, which she did, and you screw up, you are held accountable regardless of race and gender. this is, this victimization stuff is backfiring i am afraid and it is all the cards she think she has and she is running the meeting and was arrogant. >> it comes from the top down, since the president was re-elected, we saw the thing we talked about in the first segment with him trying to take the power away to raise the debt debt. that is unbelievable. and i think he things he can have anyone he wants and stick it down the senator's throats. >>gregg: do you think he will nominate her? >> i don't think he can. he will have to go of necessity, to john kerry who the republicans will confirm in a second a
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
. >>> syria may have no working internet right now, but the fighting is raging on. the country's civil war is focusing right now on damascus international airport on the outskirts of the capital. they have surrounded it on one side and trying to keep the war jets grounded and stop its flow of weapons. syrian state-run tv insists the airport is functioning normally, though. >>> ford is issuing a voluntary recall of its 2013 escape and fusion models today. there are reports of engines overheating and then vehicle fires when the engine is running. there have been no injuries reported, but if you own one of these models, ford wants you to contact the dealer immediately. repair procedures, they don't know about those yet. >>> today 17-year-old jordan davis will be laid to rest in an atlanta suburb. the high school senior was shot to death at a florida gas station following a disagreement about loud music. 45-year-old michael dunn is charged with davis' murder in a case that remind some of the trayvon martin shooting in florida. but dunn's attorney said there is no comparison here and her client
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're absolutely right that people who are worried about egypt right now absolutely see it going in this illiberal direction. the constitution guarantees some individual rights, has great language about individual rights, but it makes it all subject to the sharia or principles of the sharia. >> the state is given charge of public morality. a loose open ended term. >> absolutely. women's rights, for example which there's been a constitutional article that said the state will work to achieve equality between men and women. as long as it doesn't violate principles of the sharia. that was in the constitution. now it's gone. now there's a nondiscrimination clause, but it doesn't mention women as a protected class. it is a step backwards in terms of liberties. if you believe what we care about when we look at democracy, we don't just care about the voting, it is important, we care about freedom and liberty for peo
our civil system. >> sean: are we or aren't we, though? >> i don't know, sean. that's the problem. >> sean: we had promises in the past that appear to be broken. >> right. >> and a setup report that says, oh, yeah we can hold these -- >> sean: this goes back -- >> they play by their own rules, sean. that's the problem. legally speaking they're finding a way to get around it and circumvent the rules to make it work based on the promises that they made prior to the election. that's what this is. i'm not surprised. they said they wanted to do this, tried to back off it, because it's controversial and improper. why would you, given the prison population, put these people in to create more domestic terrorists? >> sean: i think i know the answer. it seems to be rooted in man-caused disaster, overseas contingency, fort hood is workplace violent, and can't label benghazi a terrorist attack. there's a pattern of denial about what the threat is. >> now we can worry about how we're going to house these folks, but i'd like worry about how to find the mastermind who's been identified in every
to pay for the clean-up. right? >> that's right. they set aside a $20 billion fund voluntarily to compensate victims. there is also going to be additional penalties as part of civil violations of the clean water act, estimated to be 21 billion. >> that's probably going to be handed down in the next few months. this is just to settle criminal charges for the company pled guilty to 14 criminal guilty pleas, 11 counts 50 seaman's manslaughter, a criminal violation of the clean water act, a migratory bird act and for obstruction of justice, for submitting false information to the congressional investigation during the summer of 2010. >> the 20 billion clean-up fund the 21mul billion. >> for the clean water. >> billion? 41? so this criminal fine was? >> four and a half 689. >> >>. >> so $50,000,000,000. >> the company said aside all of that money. they had been selling off assets and they've got a huge cash reserve and the 20 billion for clean up that's in the fund. >> they can absorb this and stay in business? >> absolutely. >> that's been their plan.
worried about president morici sweeping it. that is more what the protests are about right now. ashley: what is the biggest danger, that this just dissolves into full-blown civil unrest? >> well, i think, even a bigger danger is the creeping of egyptian society. people are quite worried about it at this moment. it will actually prevent voters being informed on what is and isn't. ashley: expansion of powers for president morsi, kind of just voted himself into this position. is there anything that can be done about this? >> what the muslim brotherhood claims is that the last year and a half has been bad for society and bad for the economy. they need to get to this transition phase. get the constitution approved and get the country back to business. there are a lot of egyptian, so little social trust there right now. people are really fearful right now. ashley: this puts the u.s. in a bit of a difficult situation. there is a lot of money that comes to the united states to help the egyptian military. here we are, again, what does the u.s. do in this situation? it has to be a concern. >> ab
for those caught near the front lines of the civil war, especially children. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is risking her life right now, one of the few western reporters on the ground inside northern syria. >> reporter: they are home again. but they are cold and broke and still in danger. about a third of the families who fled the neighborhood of aleppo have come back, only to find out that these streets are now on the front lines. if the regime can retake the neighborhood, it can cut off the main artery for opposition forces in aleppo and reopen a route to the airport. on a nearby hilltop, the neighborhood, the rebels used to control this one as well but lost it a month ago. the battle lines here are constantly fluid and snipers are a constant threat. the front line is visible just through here. and we can barely make out three bodies. the rebel fighters are telling us that they're two male and one female. there were five. they managed to extract two, but they can't reach the others. for the children here, gunfire has become background noise. this 12-year-old har
the answer to that right now. sort of on the definition of insanity. we're doing the same thing ore and over again. doing the same thing we did in libya. getting involved in yet again in a civil war. i wonder what those senators will have to say in a year or two or five if we provide a surface to air missile that gets used to take down a jet liner in europe or africa. >> what we saw in libya, all the weapons that have gone missing in northern mali and some apparently got into the hands of hamas and gaza. seems to be libya on steroids in terms of the thipgs that can go wrong. >> i think it's kind of ludicrous to provide them with surface to air missiles. i think what they need more than anything else is ammunition and small arms and really intelligence. especially with the internet going down, it's harder for them to communicate with each other. radios are down across the coun country. they need help in a range of ways. i think our intelligence apparatus and our special operations units can do this in general a have done this clandestinely over the years, so i think we can do this and provide
about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medicare, and doing some cuts there under this plan. but compare it to the white house plan, very different
responsible for paying civil penalties. bill: late last night if you missed this, the senate voted to keep the terror suspects at gitmo right where they are. they will not come here if the senate has its way. the measure will block the transfer of detainees to u.s. soil. a day of at report identified facilities in the u.s. believed to be capable housing them. senators approved the measure, 54-41. general yak keen, jack keane, is flies to see you again. melissa: good morning, bill. bill: does this mean gitmo does not close not even in a second term or does the president come and veto this? melissa: there i think will be pressure to try to close it which doesn't make a lot of sense to me. we have enemy combatants in there as a result of a war. the frustration is the war has gone on for a long time and therefore we should do something about these detainees. we're not making the choice for the war going on a long time. the al qaeda and affiliates are making that choice. they just burned down our consulate and killed our ambassador and forced close sure of a cia base. they're protracking the wa
of the house? >> all right. >> all right. you guys are -- were you okay in the green room? nobody separated you two, did they? it was a civil? >> no, we get along. >> in the green room -- >> any bagels in there for you guys? >> no, we don't eat bagels. >> guys on monday got bagels. >> the bagels were there? >> it's all good. >> i judge what we think -- >> i'm jewish, when i walk into a room, i immediately know if there are bagels. >> did you get a tree? >> a holiday tree? >> yeah. >> you do? >> my wife says no, they're too messy. >> the christmas tree is the celebration of saturn, anybody could have a christmas tree. >> did you get a festivus pole? >> now you're talking. >> this is a family show. >> it's early. >> thank you very much, dan. we appreciate it. chris is sticking around. up next, we are half way through the holiday shopping season. we're going to look at the winners and losers after this. >>> and 7:40 eastern time, steven ross, looking to revitalize a major area of new york. we're going to talk business and football when he joins us in a few minutes. drum and flute" can look who's b
been critical to getting the word out. video like the one posted on-line. this one right here. shows peaceful demonstrations against president bashir aul awes yad that began last year and spiralled into now what is happening. >> activists regularly posting these videos and articles about the civil war that is taking place there. often these are really just only the images we are able to get from the front lines wrush see it there. she is co-founder and managing editor of syrian deeply.org. you're a former correspondent with abc and bloomberg as well. you have seen some of the -- what is taking place there. what do you make of the civil war? >> my heart breaks like the ones in arwa's piece. what we felt we had to do was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more bac
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)